Neuroradiology

Interventional neuroradiology, instead of classical open surgery, is a top area of specialization that focuses on the treatment of brain and spinal cord vascular diseases under the guidance of high technology and imaging techniques. Radiology physicians who are experts by completing 6-year medical school and 4-year residency training must complete an additional 2-3-year training program in order to become an interventional neuroradiologist.

The basic technique used in treatment is angiography. After the 1990s, rapid changes have been experienced in this area in parallel with the technological development. As a result, the field of application has expanded and the diseases that can be treated in this way have gained variety.

Diseases that are Treated

  • Atherosclerotic strictures
  • Cerebral Vascular Aneurysm (bubble)
  • Dural fistula- caroticocavernous fistula
  • Retinoblastoma and other tumor treatments
  • Stroke (acute stroke), sudden paralysis, GNR
  • Arteriovenous malformation (entanglement) in the cerebral vessel

The most well-known application is the treatment of vascular bubbles that cause cerebral hemorrhage. This is followed by the treatment of cerebral vascular tangles and especially stenosis developing in the carotid artery.

The most important advantage of interventional neuroradiology in treatment is that it is “tissue-friendly”. The nature of the surgery is to make an incision, no matter how successful the results are. When the cut tissue heals, it will not be like the original. However, since the disease area is reached by going through the vessel in GNR procedures, such a problem does not occur and it is more easily tolerated by the patient.

Other advantages are easy access to vascular areas that are difficult and risky to reach surgically by external incision; easier treatment in patients whose general condition is critical due to cerebral hemorrhage, allowing vasospasm (shrinkage of vessels) due to cerebral hemorrhage to expand the vessel.